Capitol Rioter Brian Mock

He was prepared to die and leave four kids behind: ‘I was at peace with that knowledge’

MOCK told Witness 8 he ‘beat the shit’ out of a police officer

Brian Mock faces at least four charges, including assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder, and acts of physical violence in the grounds or any of the Capitol buildings

.ipg
INVESTIGATIVE PRESS GROUP

The FBI says that Brian Mock went to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 unsure of what he would face, but as he shared on social media just days later, he was prepared to fully commit to whatever came his way — even death. “I went to the Capitol not knowing what to expect but said goodbye to my 4 children, not sure if I was going to come home,” Mock wrote on Facebook on Jan. 8, according to federal documents charging Mock with multiple crimes. “I was at peace with that knowledge.” Mock, 43, is one of the latest people to be arrested for crimes related to the siege on the U.S. Capitol, according to a statement from the Justice Department.

Citing court documents, the DOJ said that Mock was captured on body-worn camera footage “repeatedly assaulting multiple law enforcement officers who were trying to protect the building from rioters.” Mock reportedly shoved a U.S. Capitol Police officer to the ground and kicked him as another rioter grabbed the officer’s legs. Mock also allegedly “cornered” Capitol and Metropolitan Police officers, and shoved another Capitol police officer to the ground.

As the mob “continued to advance and assault other officers,” Mock also “picked up multiple [Capitol Police] riot shields and passed them back to other members of the violent crowd,” according to the DOJ.

According to the DOJ, Mock’s girlfriend posted pictures and bragging about her and Mock’s Jan. 6 experience.

“Teargassed 6 times, pepper sprayed, and mustard gassed at the end,” Mock’s girlfriend allegedly wrote. “But we stayed true to being Patriots, marched to the Capital [sic] and stormed the Frontline… no regrets… ashamed of the blue that harmed everyone there to stand for the cause..”

The charging documents also show that Mock made sure to take in some of the sights Washington had to offer ahead of joining the crowd of Donald Trump supporters and violently breaching the U.S. Capitol Building.

“Before we went to the Capital [sic]… we did a little sight seeing…” read a caption of a Facebook post, where Mock is seen posing in front of the Minnesota pillar at the World War II Memorial.

FBI investigators confirmed Mock’s identity with at least eight different witnesses, including one who told the FBI that Mock “went to DC specifically for this. He is home bragging about beating up cops and destroying property in the capital [sic],” according to the charging documents.

Another witness told the FBI that they had feared Mock was a “radical” who would participate in violent protests in Minnesota. The same witness said that Mock and his girlfriend were at the “DC Capitol attack, did not enter the Capitol but were actively removing fencing … they went to the Capitol to protest and both were tear gassed.” This witness said that Mock had a “criminal history involving guns,” which the FBI investigator confirmed in the charging documents.

“According to Witness 8, MOCK told Witness 8 he ‘beat the shit’ out of a police officer.’ Witness 8 showed me text messages between Witness 8 and MOCK, where MOCK admits to his participation in the riots,” documents said.

Mock faces at least four charges, including assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder, and acts of physical violence in the grounds or any of the Capitol buildings.

He made his initial court appearance at the U.S. District Court in St. Paul on Friday afternoon.

According to the DOJ, some 465 people have been arrested on charges related to the Jan. 6 Capitol siege, including over 130 individuals charged with assaulting or impeding law enforcement.

Read more

Intelligence failures left police officers exposed to a violent mob of Trump supporters

The deadly insurrection at the US Capitol was “planned in plain sight” but intelligence failures left police officers exposed to a violent mob of Trump supporters, a Senate investigation has found. The Capitol police intelligence division had been gathering online data since December about plots to storm the building on 6 January, including messages such as: “Bring guns. It’s now or never.” But a combination of bad communications, poor planning, faulty equipment and lack of leadership meant the warnings went unheeded, allowing the insurrectionists to overrun the Capitol and disrupt certification of Joe Biden’s election victory. Five people died.

Prosecutors investigating whether Ukrainians meddled in 2020 election

Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn have been investigating whether several Ukrainian officials helped orchestrate a wide-ranging plan to meddle in the 2020 presidential campaign, including using Rudolph W. Giuliani to spread their misleading claims about President Biden and tilt the election in Donald J. Trump’s favor, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Most Americans want the people who invaded the Capitol to be prosecuted

The US House of Representatives voted on May 19th to create an independent commission to investigate the invasion of the Capitol building on January 6th. Members voted 252 in favor of, and 175 against, the commission, which was inspired in part by a similar body that investigated the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Every Democratic member voted in favor of the bill.

Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani ask judge to drop Capitol riot conspiracy case

Former President Donald Trump and his onetime personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani on Thursday asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit accusing them of conspiring to incite the deadly invasion of the U.S. Capitol. The lawsuit, brought by Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and 10 other House Democrats, accuses the defendants of violating the federal Ku Klux Klan Act on Jan. 6 by fomenting a mob of Trump's supporters to stop Congress from confirming President Joe Biden's electoral victory. Separate motions to dismiss the suit on Thursday argued that Trump's and Giuliani's remarks at a pre-riot rally near the Capitol were protected under the First Amendment.