Republicans

Marjorie Taylor Greene spars with GOP lawmaker over QAnon

Greene has previously voiced her support for QAnon, the baseless conspiracy theory that alleges there's a cabal of Democrats and global elites running an international child trafficking ring and attempting to control the government

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POLITICS PRESS GROUP

Marjorie Taylor Greene, a House GOP candidate who has shown support for QAnon, sparred with Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-Va.) on Twitter over the weekend regarding a recent House-passed resolution condemning the conspiracy theory.

Greene, the GOP nominee for a House race in Georgia, argued that Riggleman and and Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-N.J.), who both sponsored the QAnon resolution, have not done enough to condemn the far-left activist group antifa.

“Hey @Malinowski and @RepRiggleman, I assume you're working late tonight putting together a resolution condemning Antifa and 'rejecting' the violence they promote? Antifa is no 'conspiracy theory.' #AntifaTerrorists,” she tweeted.

Antifa is no "conspiracy theory." #AntifaTerrorists

Greene’s comments came after the fatal shooting of a man in Denver, with Greene claiming the shooter was a member of antifa. Denver police have said the shooter is not linked with the far-left movement.

Riggleman, who has publicly condemned antifa, responded to Greene by saying his “thoughts last night were w/ the family of the man killed,” adding that she shouldn’t “encourage those who are fact challenged-conspiracy theorists like those in #QAnon- or LEFT & RIGHT fringe groups.”

Don’t encourage those who are fact challenged-conspiracy theorists like those in #QAnon- or LEFT & RIGHT fringe groups

Check your facts. @DenverPolice can help you. # FactsMatter https://t.co/YRi7JFG1mR https://t.co/fyD4F9o0Qc— Congressman Denver Riggleman (@RepRiggleman) October 11, 2020

Greene went on to accuse Riggleman of “parroting” Democratic talking points.

Riggleman then responded with a meme, telling Greene that “she may go now.”

.@mtgreenee https://t.co/rBwanr5wA6 pic.twitter.com/unyOS3yDBY

— Congressman Denver Riggleman (@RepRiggleman) October 11, 2020
She shot back by drawing attention to Riggleman's primary defeat earlier this year.

“I would say hopefully we can work well together in January, but it’s likely passing useless resolutions that don’t target the real threat are why you got primaried. Your meddling in my election didn’t hurt me either. America is ready for Republicans that fight back,” she tweeted.

Greene has previously voiced her support for QAnon, the baseless conspiracy theory that alleges there's a cabal of Democrats and global elites running an international child trafficking ring and attempting to control the government. She later attempted to distance herself from “Q,” stating that she no longer associates with it after finding “misinformation."

But over the weekend she took aim at the bipartisan nonbinding resolution passed by the House, arguing that QAnon doesn’t pose a “real threat.”

The resolution, which passed in a 371-18 vote earlier this month, cited numerous examples of violence and criminal activity seen from QAnon supporters and calls for federal law enforcement and the FBI to allocate additional resources toward countering conspiracy-driven extremism.

Greene, who won the Republican primary runoff in Georgia’s 14th District in August, also came under fire earlier this year after videos emerged of her making bigoted remarks and publicly questioning whether a plane crashed into the Pentagon on 9/11. She later walked back the remarks.

The nonpartisan Cook Political Report lists the 14th Congressional District as "solid Republican," meaning Greene is largely expected to win in November.

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