John Dean

'Only a matter of how many days' until Trump is indicted

John Dean: 'Only a matter of how many days' until Trump is indicted

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US PRESS GROUP

John Dean, the former White House counsel to former President Nixon, on Thursday, predicted that former President Trump would soon be indicted after reports that his ex-lawyer Michael Cohen has met with the Manhattan district attorney's office for a number of interviews.

“From personal experience, as a key witness, I assure you that you do not visit a prosecutor’s office 7 times if they are not planning to indict those about whom you have knowledge. It is only a matter of how many days until DA Vance indicts Donald & Co,” Dean wrote on Twitter.

On Wednesday, it was reported that Cohen had met with the Manhattan DA's office for a seventh time as part of a criminal investigation into Trump's finances. Cohen is expected to participate in an eighth meeting in the near future.

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. (D) is pursuing a wide-ranging investigation into Trump’s family business and finances.

The probe is looking into several aspects of Trump's finances and businesses. On Tuesday it was reported that the Manhattan DA's office was intensifying its investigation into Trump, paying particular attention to his Seven Springs estate in New York. Previous reports have indicated that Vance is looking to find out if the value of the property was inflated in order to reap greater benefits from financial institutions.

The district attorney’s office obtained Trump's tax returns from his accounting firm, Mazars USA, just last month after a lengthy legal dispute over access to the documents. The development came after the Supreme Court rebuffed a last-ditch effort by Trump’s attorneys to shield the documents from the investigation.

Dean served as a key witness in the 1973 Senate trials regarding the Watergate scandal and detailed during his testimony how White House officials, including Nixon, obstructed justice in order to cover up the break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.

Dean was later convicted of obstruction of justice and served four months in prison, after which he published two books about his role in the Watergate scandal.

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